FIFTH AVENUE IN THE FIFTIES: Not only as in 59th Street but as in the 1950s. Walking in the Easter Parade? Post your pictures of what this intersection looks like today. This is a color-printed aquatint by Karl Dehmann who was known for his prints and paintings of the New York City skyline and architecture. It’s also on sale through May 15. More here: https://www.georgeglazer.com/prints/aanda/historic/dehmann.html

FIFTH AVENUE IN THE FIFTIES: Not only as in 59th Street but as in the 1950s. Walking in the Easter Parade? Post your pictures of what this intersection looks like today. This is a color-printed aquatint by Karl Dehmann who was known for his prints and paintings of the New York City skyline and architecture. It’s also on sale through May 15. More here: https://www.georgeglazer.com/prints/aanda/historic/dehmann.html

GREAT GREEK: This striking print of the ancient Greek playwright Sophocles was produced as one of a suite of 12 engravings of famous Greek and Roman philosophers and emperors, drawn by Rubens after antique busts or heads, and engraved under his close supervision. More on: http://www.georgeglazer.com/prints/aanda/art-pre20/sophocles.html

GREAT GREEK: This striking print of the ancient Greek playwright Sophocles was produced as one of a suite of 12 engravings of famous Greek and Roman philosophers and emperors, drawn by Rubens after antique busts or heads, and engraved under his close supervision. More on: http://www.georgeglazer.com/prints/aanda/art-pre20/sophocles.html

SOCIETY FOR THE DIFFUSION OF USEFUL KNOWLEDGE: The London firm Malby & Son put out globes during the mid 19th century for the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge, an organization dedicated to making educational materials available to the working classes. This 6-inch globe was published in 1866 and is on sale through April 15 (see http://www.georgeglazer.com/news/features.html for the sale price) More about the globe here: http://www.georgeglazer.com/globes/table/malby6.html

SOCIETY FOR THE DIFFUSION OF USEFUL KNOWLEDGE: The London firm Malby & Son put out globes during the mid 19th century for the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge, an organization dedicated to making educational materials available to the working classes. This 6-inch globe was published in 1866 and is on sale through April 15 (see http://www.georgeglazer.com/news/features.html for the sale price) More about the globe here: http://www.georgeglazer.com/globes/table/malby6.html

NEWS FROM CRIMEA: In the 1850s, that is. This is from a series of prints that provide a pictorial journalistic account of the Crimean War (1853-1856), which began as a conflict between Russia and Turkey around the Crimean peninsula, and was soon joined by other nations, notably Great Britain and France, who were concerned about Russia’s attempt to expand its power. That concern, of course, has been revived in the past few weeks.
More here: http://www.georgeglazer.com/prints/military/simpsoncalam.html

NEWS FROM CRIMEA: In the 1850s, that is. This is from a series of prints that provide a pictorial journalistic account of the Crimean War (1853-1856), which began as a conflict between Russia and Turkey around the Crimean peninsula, and was soon joined by other nations, notably Great Britain and France, who were concerned about Russia’s attempt to expand its power. That concern, of course, has been revived in the past few weeks.

More here: http://www.georgeglazer.com/prints/military/simpsoncalam.html

Our new group of featured sale rare prints and globes are guided by the sayings of two Greek poets: “The Journey Is the Thing” (Homer) and “Always desire to learn something useful” (Sophocles). Shown above, “Blind Homer” shows the Greek poet carrying a lyre and led by a youth. The pair stands on a rock outcropping against a dramatic stormy seascape, light breaking through dark clouds. Gérard destroyed the original painting, so we only know it today from this 1816 engraving.
See this and the rest of the featured items here —http://www.georgeglazer.com/news/features.html

Our new group of featured sale rare prints and globes are guided by the sayings of two Greek poets: “The Journey Is the Thing” (Homer) and “Always desire to learn something useful” (Sophocles). Shown above, “Blind Homer” shows the Greek poet carrying a lyre and led by a youth. The pair stands on a rock outcropping against a dramatic stormy seascape, light breaking through dark clouds. Gérard destroyed the original painting, so we only know it today from this 1816 engraving.

See this and the rest of the featured items here —http://www.georgeglazer.com/news/features.html

ABSOLUTELY FABULOUS: In honor of Mardi Gras week, we bring you “Louisiana and South Mississippi: Fabulous Wonderland of America,” a wacky 1951 pictorial map by Gus Levy, who started in New Orleans as a newspaper cartoonist and ended up a successful ad executive. More here: http://www.georgeglazer.com/maps/florida/louisianalevy.html

ABSOLUTELY FABULOUS: In honor of Mardi Gras week, we bring you “Louisiana and South Mississippi: Fabulous Wonderland of America,” a wacky 1951 pictorial map by Gus Levy, who started in New Orleans as a newspaper cartoonist and ended up a successful ad executive. More here: http://www.georgeglazer.com/maps/florida/louisianalevy.html

TGIF: The “Merry-makers Map of San Francisco” is a humorous and bawdy guide to the city’s nightlife around 1940. It was designed as a folding pictorial pocket map, presumably for actual use, to locate the 49 highlighted restaurants, cocktail lounges, nightclubs and bars. The illustrations emphasize the city’s reputation for uninhibited entertainment, especially in the neighborhood known as The Barbary Coast.
More here: http://georgeglazer.com/maps/western/merrymakers.html

TGIF: The “Merry-makers Map of San Francisco” is a humorous and bawdy guide to the city’s nightlife around 1940. It was designed as a folding pictorial pocket map, presumably for actual use, to locate the 49 highlighted restaurants, cocktail lounges, nightclubs and bars. The illustrations emphasize the city’s reputation for uninhibited entertainment, especially in the neighborhood known as The Barbary Coast.

More here: http://georgeglazer.com/maps/western/merrymakers.html

TGIF: Henry Schile’s 1875 chromolithograph of “The 10 Commandments of Taverns” provides tongue-in-cheek rules for bar patrons. In German and English, the print was designed for his fellow German-American immigrants, who then made up 30% of the population of New York City making it one of the most populous “German” cities in the world after Berlin and Vienna. Illustrated vignettes portray bar games and activities such as billiards, bowling, chess, dominos and — incredibly — indoor target shooting with firearms. More details here: http://www.georgeglazer.com/prints/genre/schiletavern.html